70 A.D. A WAR OF THE JEWS

70 A.D. A War of the Jews


70 A.D. A War of the Jews

by Peter J. Fast

Historical/Fiction

Conquering the world as masters of an empire was infused into the Roman psyche since the days of Carthage. Yet crushing rebellions in the midst of expansionism would be inevitable. The most ardent against Roman tyranny were the Jewish Zealots in the Province of Judea. Perceived by the Romans as criminals and by many Jews as liberators, the Zealots would finally cast off the shackles of oppression, slaughter the Roman garrison in Jerusalem, and declare war against the most powerful empire ever seen…the stage had been set and the year was 66 A.D.

Centurion Gaius Cornelius Antony of the Thundering Twelfth Legion is part of the largest Roman army fielded in over a hundred years, the mission: to take Jerusalem and crush the dying embers of the Jewish rebellion after three years of war. Known as a man of honour, Gaius’ skill and leadership in battle is exemplary, yet his intuition to see its bloody outcome always haunts him. As the struggle for Jerusalem commences and crosses fill the landscape, he will lead his men boldly forward for the glory of Rome.

Judah ben Yosef is a Jewish man consumed by hate and bitterness at the murder of his betrothed; he will stop at nothing until the Roman responsible is dead, a man simply known as Capito. Judah’s faith and desire for God to fill him with peace in the midst of war always stands before him and yet seems impossible. Thus, entangled in a city of starvation, disease, inner fighting, and competing warlords, Judah’s loyalty, allegiance, and service will be tested as he yearns to fulfill his vengeance while Jerusalem is threatened by the fury of the legions.

Soon, Gaius and Judah, Roman and Jew, will meet while the survival of Jerusalem could be at stake.

******

“For those who wish to explore the brutality of this period, the novel has much to offer, with droves of characters and many subplots, tactical twists and bursts of gut-wrenching suspense.” – Kirkus Indie

“A solid war novel that will entertain history buffs for weeks…” – Kirkus Indie

Available Now In Softcover/Hardcover/Ebook

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ISBN: 6×9 Paperback (978-1-4772-6585-7)
6×9 Hardcover (978-1-4772-6584-0)
Ebook (978-1-4772-6586-4)
Suggested Retail Price:
$29.99 – Paperback
$36.99 – Hardcover
$9.99 – Ebook

Published by AuthorHouse

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5 responses to “70 A.D. A WAR OF THE JEWS

  1. Dear Peter,

    I would like to ask how I can obtain the use of the photo of Jerusalem burning. It is a great piece. It would be used in a documentary for about 3-5 seconds. Please let me know what your policy is for the use of this picture. I am the producer of a film on the site of the Jewish temple. (It is my belief that after the city was destroyed the Jewish people lost track of where their temple stood. The accounts of Josephus seem to point in a different direction then what is commonly held. I live in the USA. Where do you reside?

    My email is kbklein28@gamil.com

    thanks,

    ken Klein

    • Hello Ken,

      I am living in Jerusalem, Israel, where it all happened.:) That is an interesting idea concerning the film you are working on. I have thoroughly studied different opinions and accounts of where the Temple would have stood and I believe that the place of the Dome of the Rock is incorrect, even though that is where many scholars and pastors say it is today. If you look into the Rabbinic sources, as well as other historical sources, the Temple was supposed to be in line with the East Gate or Golden Gate, and you should have been able to look directly through it into the Temple sanctuary. On two occasions, with the scapegoat on Yom Kippur and the sacrifice of the Red Heffier, the priests (according to Rabbinic Jewish sources) were supposed to be able to look from the Mount of Olives and into the Temple if the gates were open. So, we also know that the Temple was to sit on bedrock, and there are three locations. By the Al Aksa Mosque, where the Dome of the Rock sits, and further to the right of the Dome where there is a piece of bedrock under a little stone canopy known as the Dome of the Spirits. I believe the Dome of the Spirits to be the most probable, and it lines up with Rabbinic accounts and also is big enough to be a threshing floor according to the Bible. What do you think? These are just some thoughts.

      As far as the picture goes, it is a fantastic piece. I used it through Wikipedia and so I would contact them. You can find the picture and if you look at the details then you should be able to request it for official use. I hope this helps. Anyway, let me know about the progress of your film as I am most interested. I don’t know if you read my synopsis on my novel I am publishing, but I am publishing a Historical Fiction novel on the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD and so the Temple naturally plays a huge role in the book. Anyway, thank you for visiting my website and all the best with your documentary.

      Cheers,
      Peter J. Fast

  2. Pingback: To sign or not to sign a book…that is the question. | Peter J. Fast

  3. I just finished reading “70 A.D.” Everything about this book is BIG. A profoundly moving, brutally graphic, meticulously researched, epic tale of redemption. Move over, Josephus. A master storyteller has just brought history to life.

    • Thank you, Kathy for your great review!!!! It certainly is a pleasure to hear that you enjoyed the read. It is certainly always great to get feedback like this! I am sure you will enjoy the next book to the series, “Wars of the Jews” entitled, “164 B.C. A War of the Jews” which will be published in the summer of 2014.

      Cheers
      Peter J. Fast

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